Saturday, 3 September 2011

That woman





she is full of allure 
sultry black eyes
dark teasing lips


brimming of theatrics
a day with her
drama and angst 


unsatisfied with
my silent affections, 
tossed gift of pearls
out into street


I play the sax
cool tunes to woo  
but no, she wants my
bold wordy intentions


how do i begin
tell her she got me at
palm of her hand


now she is gone
chasing madly after 
hobo down the street 




Author's Note:   This post is for D'verse Poets Pub:   Poetics.  Prompt is Silent Movies  of Charlie Chaplin (clip from A Woman in Paris)


Also shared with Poetry Jam.  Hosted by Evelyn - prompt is Humor in Poems.


picture credit:   from here

46 comments:

  1. how do i begin
    tell her she got me at
    palm of her hand

    i like that

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  2. that little clip said so much didn't it? I like your play on 'silent affections'.

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  3. Hesitance proves that she lost what she had at the palm of her hand, didn't it? What a great response to the prompt.

    Beth

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  4. I love those eyes and the way you described them and her.

    You open so well:

    she is full of allure
    sultry black eyes
    dark teasing lips

    and it was smoothed all through.
    Thank you, well done.

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  5. brilliant from start to finish...spot on my friend :)

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  6. Good one... She sounds like quite the character.

    http://lkkolp.wordpress.com/2011/09/03/sevenling-they-both-agreed/

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  7. chasing madly hobo down the street, I know that woman, I've seen her.

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  8. Very cool and sleek writing - capturing a zany dame - nice write heaven

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  9. Wow. I love this: "she wants my
    bold wordy intentions"

    ~ safehousepoetry.wordpress.com

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  10. She had "it," didn't she. She had to say with her face what later stars -- Marilyn Monroe -- could say with her voice and her body.

    Good poem.

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  11. Wonderfully captured right from the get go.

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  12. Oh, wow, this is excellent,truly excellent. I can picture the scene.

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  13. Thanks for your wonderful comments everyone. I appreciate it.

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  14. I play the sax
    cool tunes to woo
    but no, she wants my
    bold wordy intentions

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  15. brimming of theatrics
    a day with her
    drama and angst....

    At first I thought, "Why is Heaven writing about me - I'm not the prompt. I'm the host!" (smiles)

    In all seriousness...

    silent affections and wordy intentions - what a deep and meaningful contrast. What do women really want - even in today's time?

    And the last stanza is a hoot - I actually laughed outloud. Thanks, Heaven, this was great.

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  16. yes it feels like universal folly =)

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  17. I enjoyed this, don't know why my last line didn't show up, sorry for the error (I didn't mean to just quote a stanza back at you). In response, me too.

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  18. Yep, even in the good old days, they still knew how to 'use' good old sexy looks too. :) Nice piece.

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  19. Great take on that clip. Something just amusing in that picture of him playing his little horn and ignoring her frenzy--and her giving up her dignity to chase down her pearls...you paint it well, Heaven.

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  20. I like it! Clever piece, Heaven.

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  21. Great take on the muse. Wordy declarations of love are so difficult when you haven't found your voice yet.

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  22. nice heaven...easy come easy go eh? not sure if i feel bad for the hobo though...esp with out as sure of her necessities...smiles.

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  23. I like the irony of "bold, wordy intentions" in a silent film! Fun.

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  24. This was a fun piece, and what a great picture! I love the way you describe her in those first two stanzas :)

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  25. Beautiful imagery - I can see her :)

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  26. The last stanza is perfect! Brought a smile.

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  27. Ha, I bet she broke lots of hearts. Very nice photo and your description was spot on. A great and enjoyable presentation.

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  28. Ah Lulu -- and all of you other pre-Code silent starlets --you were a doozy of a floozy. Without words the eyes speak volumes. And you always ended up with the happy fool, an everyman just like plain ole bumbling me. Loved it. -- Brendan

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  29. Wonderful! Love the throw to the hobo, and yes, I'm smiling. Awesome play on the prompt, lady!

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  30. Brilliant depiction of this dark, mercurial siren. I love the final stanza's funny twist.

    David

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  31. She really does look like she's full of allure.

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  32. Wonderful ....love the hobo line :) happy Sunday !

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  33. Great portrait of the lady in the picture, though by the last line I am not sure if she is a lady. Whimsical and lyrical, a fun poem.

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  34. Heavens,
    How cruel it was! She was such a dish, so alluring and so pretty. She was heavenly!

    Hank

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  35. An interesting portrait in a humorous way. Like it

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  36. i think lots of women chased that hobo down the street. what a cool hobo chaplin was. no cool hobo characters in mainstream movies or television these days. it's no mistake.

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  37. Oh, this is delicious! I love the pearls, and especially her chasing after a hobo. Charlie, get back here!

    Love the vampy photo of Theda Bara, too! That is her isn't it?

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  38. Chic and cool and courageous, just like her!

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  39. Thank you for your wonderful comments.

    Fireblossom: No this is not Theda Bara. I can understand why you thought of Theda as she started the sex siren image in silent movies.

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  40. stunning humor.

    she is beautiful after all.

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  41. perfect talent and humor.


    Funny Bunny Fridays week 2 is open for humor entries right now,

    Welcome in,

    It is never too late to share a laughter with your peer bloggers.

    Keep smiling.
    Bless your Tuesday.
    xoxox

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  42. I was really stumped by that dverse prompt.
    great work!

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  43. i have not watched "a woman in paris" but i see how closely this poem relate with the picture. there is a hidden sense of humor too which makes this a joyous read.

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  44. Beautiful poem full of great description.

    http://jackedwardspoetry.blogspot.com/2011/09/brothers.html

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